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Exhibit captures Texas drought through the lenses of citizen photographers

Written by , published October 30, 2013

Wildfires, parched pastures, evaporating lakes—we all have our own experience of the drought that’s been plaguing Texas in recent years. A photo exhibit on display this week at the State Capitol shares new perspectives from citizens across the state.

Dry lake bed at Lake Meredith. Photo © Kent Satterwhite. Dry lake bed at Lake Meredith. Photo © Kent Satterwhite.

The Texas Department of Agriculture, Texas Water Development Board, and Texas Parks and Wildlife Department are showcasing the photographs as part of their “What does your Texas drought look like?” campaign.

The exhibit opened Monday and continues through Friday in the Capitol’s 2nd Floor Extension, Central Gallery.

Despite recent rainfall in much of the state, 62 percent of Texas remains in drought and another 24 percent is “abnormally dry,” according to the federal government’s U.S. Drought Monitor.

The exhibit includes some of the hundreds of images that people across Texas shared via Flickr, Instagram, and Twitter as part of the agencies’ photo project. You can see some of the photos on the project’s Flickr page.

“The project has created a historical record of the drought, and represents both water supply deficits and the ways Texans deal with drought through conservation efforts,” according to a news release.

If we get the rainfall predicted this week, let’s hope the exhibit stays up for another couple of weeks. It couldn’t hurt.

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