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English rock star Phil Collins, a dedicated Alamo history buff, is donating his treasure trove of Alamo Battle and Texas Revoluation artifacts to the State of Texas, the Texas General Land Office has announced. 

Published in Blog

The Alamo opens a new exhibit this weekend that examines the sometimes-overlooked history of Hispanic defenders of the Alamo. Standing Their Ground: Tejanos and the Alamo opens Saturday and runs through June 6.

Published in Blog

EDITOR’S NOTE: Stories on the Alamo inevitably stir deep emotions, and Jan Reid’s personal reflection on the storied shrine in the September issue was no exception. Some readers found the piece compelling, some took offense to certain ideas expressed, and some pointed out factual errors. We appreciate all of the feedback, and have posted the responses below. For an updated version of the story, click here.

Published in TRAVEL

The landmark arched-gable façade of Texas' famous mission was introduced during restoration in the 1850s. The hump-backed façade of the Alamo, the 18th-Century mission chapel that actually comprised just a small part of the fabled killing field of 1836, is the profile and shrine of Texas. U.S. Army engineers introduced the distinctive arched gable while restoring the structure in the early 1850s. But that roofline symbolizes Texans’ tradition of valor, pride, and independence. My dad attended a Wichita Falls grade school that was built to resemble and remember the Alamo, and children still go there. Another Alamo-look-alike school is closed and fallen almost to ruin in the hamlet of Mosheim; doubtless more of these relics are scattered throughout the state. That’s because our legislature in the 1920s freed up some school-building revenue contingent on architects and brick masons aping the Alamo’s silhouette.

Published in TRAVEL
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