Skip to content

Written by Texas Highways

Outside view of the new Phoenix

The question of whether The Phoenix Restaurant and Bar in Port Aransas would reopen after Hurricane Harvey was not “if” but “when.” In the aftermath of the devastating storm, the eatery’s namesake became more relevant than chef Tiana Worsham and co-owner Vanessa Brundrett could have imagined when they founded it a decade ago.

Julie Kuhlken stands in front of wine barrels at Pedernales Cellars

The growing throngs of oenophiles traveling what is known as Wine Road 290—the winery-heavy stretch of US 290 between Johnson City and Stonewall—have become very familiar with once-exotic wines like tempranillo, sangiovese, and viognier that thrive in the Texas heat and soil.

Now here’s another one to get acquainted with: tannat, an under-the-radar red wine that’s poised to become Texas’ favorite varietal. 

Ray Wylie Hubbard holding a Burmese python

Any good songwriter knows when the muse strikes, write it down. For Ray Wylie Hubbard, it was maybe the 10,000th time he was driving southbound on Interstate 35 from New Braunfels toward San Antonio, passing Exit 182 at Engel Road and the so-big-you-can’t-miss-it sign that screamed “SNAKE FARM” in red and black letters. The words, meant to entice drivers to stop at the long-running roadside attraction, conjured the image of a farm full of snakes, and Hubbard physically shuddered.

Entry to the funeral museum

"This haunted house won’t have real dead bodies in it, will it?” my son, Chet, asks as we approach the Richey Road exit on I-45 North in Houston, a note of trepidation in his voice.

At 12, he’s already quite the connoisseur of the haunted house scene. He knows the drill for most of the local October spooktaculars: a couple bloody vampires, more creep-tastic clowns than you can count, and a few costume-clad monsters jumping out from dark corners when you least expect them. But today we’re headed to the annual Haunted House at the National Museum of Funeral History on Houston’s north side. And as the haunt is being held next door to a real, live mortuary school, Chet is unsure what might await us.

Entry to a preserved adobe home

Before the first railroad line reached San Antonio in 1877, the villa was known as “the city of adobes,” according to an 1887 article in the San Antonio Daily Express. Along with rock, adobe was cited as the most common construction material. Another report in the Express noted that local adobe buildings would “endure forever almost.”

Hot coals simmer in a pit on the King Ranch

My kids know I’m happy to travel for a meal, particularly when huevos are involved, but in their minds, this was pushing it. The night before, we’d driven more than three hours across the dark, South Texas landscape to Kingsville. Now, on a Saturday morning, they were back in the car just before dawn. “But look at the light, it’s beautiful!” I told them, pointing to the horizon. “Besides, this is not just any breakfast,” I promised. “It’s a chance to experience Texas history on one of the most famous ranches in the world.”

Plan your food-inspired road trip with these 33 mom-and-pop restaurants across Texas.

Stonehenge II and Easter Island Head II in Ingram

The Texas Arts and Crafts Fair, which the legislature deemed the official arts and crafts fair of the Lone Star State in 1995, is returning this fall after five years of absence. The Hill Country Arts Foundation will debut its newly updated Ingram campus to an estimated 5,000 guests in support of more than 150 Texas artists Sept. 28-30.

These 10 County Courthouses Show off the Beauty and History of Small Town Texas

Texas' Historic County Courthouses shine with grandiosity and ambition. Often politically controversial because of their expense, courthouse projects in the 19th and early 20th centuries lasted years as counties selected architects and builders, quarried and imported materials, then painstakingly assembled the larger-than-life landmarks in the middle of town. It’s not hard to imagine a farmer stopping by a courthouse construction site to take in the scene, scratching his head at the columns, parapets, and towers rising from the prairie.

Find Museum-Quality Art in These 8 Texas Hotels

We’ve rounded up eight hotels across Texas where cultural enlightenment is a bonus amenity, and the hospitality extends beyond spas and room service. Best of all, most of these works are on display for everyone, whether staying the night or popping in for a look around.

Click the image above to continue reading.

Experience One of the Best Live Music Experiences in Texas at Houston’s Silver Slipper

In broad daylight, the Silver Slipper is hardly a looker. The compact building 4 miles northeast of downtown Houston is about as long and wide as an eight-lane bowling alley—“indistinct Minimal Traditional,” according to The Handbook of Texas. Three days a week, it’s a bar, short-order eatery, and neighborhood hangout.

Click the imag above to continue reading.


Silver Slipper

3717 Crane St. in Houston
Hosts live rhythm and blues Sat 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Doors open 8 p.m. $5 cover.
713-673-9004

A caprese wedge salad on a plate

When chef Denise Shavandy walks into the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, she often wonders if she’s dreaming. Before she found her way to cooking, Shavandy considered other career paths that might have landed her in a place like this. Fortuitously, her job as executive chef of Café Modern, the museum’s restaurant, involves crafting beautiful food next to some of the most important art anywhere, inside a building created by one of the world’s foremost design talents.

Page 1 of 194
Back to top