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Written by Texas Highways

Drink Ale TrailIt’s a typical Saturday in Fort Worth, a weekly day of celebration among craft beer fans. The popular small breweries in town are open for tastings and tours, complete with music, games, food, and frivolity.

plates green LivingChef Robert Lyford exchanges text messages daily with farmers all over Texas.

Quarterhorse17Horse racing was “the NFL of colonial times,” we’re told at the start of our visit to the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum in Amarillo, therein commencing the story of a horse breed that’s intertwined with Texas history and culture. The sleek two-story museum celebrates the quarter horse and chronicles its history with exhibits that straddle the worlds of equine enthusiasts and the rest of us.

critterwearA few years ago, I took a canoe trip on the Rio Grande through Big Bend National Park’s Santa Elena Canyon. Our group camped overnight at the mouth of the canyon, and in the morning, one of the guides called everyone over to see a tarantula as big as my hand.

Fulton00289 13 15sortIt’s safe to say that an elegant, 19th-Century mansion was not what I was expecting to see as I drove down a breezy bay-front road in Rockport. But there it was, on the same street as low-slung souvenir shops, seafood restaurants, and coastal cottage homes: a four-story, Victorian structure with sand-colored walls, dark mocha trim, and a steep mansard roof. The grand edifice looked a bit out of place among the swaying palm trees and coastal live oaks along Fulton Beach Road.

skiwaco

On the two-hour drive from Austin to the Barefoot Ski Ranch in Waco, I’ve been chattering away about my teenage summer-camp waterskiing skills. I’m looking forward to seeing if I’ve still got the chops all these years later.

ccc davis mountainsWhen I was a child, Texas’ state parks were beloved vacation destinations. I became intimately familiar with the ubiquitous brown-and-yellow signs, the stoic stone buildings, rustic cabins, and cement picnic tables that dotted the state.

MckinneyPieHot-pink roses bloom brilliantly in cement planters on all four corners of the historic downtown square in McKinney, where I’m waiting with friends on a sunny sidewalk for a crosswalk light to change.

Hillside Tube Chute at Schlitterbahn New Braunfels

When I first visited Schlitterbahn in New Braunfels as a teenager in the mid-1980s, the waterpark was just a few years old. I vividly recall spending a blistering summer day racing between the various slides, nearly losing my bikini top on a tube chute, and intentionally bumping my inner tube into cute boys while navigating the rapids and eddies of an artificial river. I came away with a wicked sunburn and memories to last a lifetime.

Gorillas

A treasure in the Rio Grande Valley, Brownsville’s Gladys Porter Zoo is a lush, 31-acre enclave built around a meandering resaca. The zoo, which is known for its success in breeding endangered animals, is home to 377 different species. In the summer, the zoo’s Summer Safari (June 6-August 12, 2016) offers classes and camps for children as young as pre-kindergarten with topics such as “Sharks and Rays” and “Junior Zookeepers.” And on Animal Play Day (July 3, 2016), zookeepers will engage the animals with entertaining enrichment activities and games, such as giving the sea lions fish encased in blocks of ice.

 Courtesy Holocaust Museum Houston

The Holocaust Museum Houston memorializes the 1.5 million children who died in the Holocaust with Taking Flight: The Butterfly Project, an exhibition of handmade butterflies crafted by children across the globe. Over the past 20 years, the museum has collected butterflies for each child lost, culminating in the exhibition and its diverse selection of creations made from materials like paper, feathers, fabric, metal, concrete, wood, and stained glass. Taking Flight runs through July 31, and the museum will exhibit cases of the butterflies at locations throughout Houston until March 2017.

 

Dallas Cowboys Nesting Dolls

Many of us tinker with collecting at some point in our lives, whether it’s an obsession with baseball cards, ceramic penguins, or some other personal fascination. In Dallas, the Perot Museum of Nature and Science explores collecting in Eye of the Collector, an exhibition of wildly diverse personal troves—from Dallas Cowboys memorabilia to PEZ dispensers, and vintage bicycles to African American dolls. “It’s important to understand that collections are why museums exist in the first place. We wouldn’t be here without them,” says Colleen Walker, museum CEO. Through September 5, 2016.

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