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Written by Texas Highways

Stuffed animals mounted on the walls inside the Buckhorn Saloon

The “Buckarita” at San Antonio’s Buckhorn Saloon serves up the kick you’d expect from a mix of Cuervo 1800 Tequila, Grand Gala, and prickly pear juice. Looking around at all the horns, antlers, and stuffed critters on the saloon walls, however, an imbiber might fear their drink so potent that they’re seeing things. Not to worry, pilgrim. That beast mounted near the antique back bar that looks like a cross between a buffalo and a Longhorn? It actually is a crossbred buffalo-Longhorn.

Exterior of the Stagecoach Inn

Salado’s Stagecoach Inn, founded in 1861, was one of the state’s oldest continually operating hotels until it closed for restoration in 2015, although it may be known best for the hushpuppies served at the inn’s restaurant.

Art on the walls inside Art of 12

Herb Smith, one of the many artists who call Wimberley home, fell in love with the village during an encounter with the Blanco River in 1974.

A kayak on the Angelina River

Paul Smith, co-owner of La Paz Bed and Breakfast in Jasper, turns his pontoon boat off the main stretch of the Angelina River, where his inn is stationed, into an offshoot called Ward’s Branch.

Inside the Bend Store

Bob Fullerton, known to most as “Bad Bob,” was hunting wasps the first time I visited the general store he owned in the rural village of Bend, just upriver from Colorado Bend State Park. Fullerton didn’t use bug spray or a tennis racket. Instead, he took a BB gun in hand as he stalked the winged insects colonizing the eaves of Bad Bob’s Bend Store. Past the front screen door and the cedar posts that hold up the building’s rusted metal roof, he pumped his gun and took aim in the vicinity of firewood being sold by the bundle.

Sunset on the Pecos River

When you launch a kayak on the lower Pecos River, you’ve made a five-day date with Mother Nature.

Fireworks at Addison Kaboom Town

Everything's bigger in Texas, and that’s certainly the case when it comes to celebrating our nation’s independence. We've compiled the ultimate guide—more than 100 events—to help you plan the perfect red, white, and blue holiday weekend.

Texas Book Festival Poster 2018

Readers rejoice: the Texas Book Festival has announced the full list of 250 authors for its 2018 event. The field of writers represent a diversity of genres that will draw in all types of readers, from young adult fiction addicts to nonfiction obsessives, and pave the way for dialogues on tough issues, from race to addiction to natural disasters.

Sotol in a glass

Ingredients:
2 oz. Desert Door Original Sotol
.3/4 oz. fresh
grapefruit juice
.1/2 oz. fresh lime juice
.1/4 oz. agave nectar
Splash of grapefruit soda

Directions:
Combine all ingredients except soda into shaker.
Add ice and shake vigorously for 8-10 seconds, then fine strain in a rocks glass with fresh ice, and top with soda. 
Garnish with a grapefruit wheel. 

Illustration of a grape

Yield: one dozen muffins:

MUFFINS
1/3 cup sugar
1/4 cup butter or margarine, softened
1 egg, beaten
2 1/3 cups all-purpose flour
4 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt
1 cup milk
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1 1/2 cups fresh or frozen blueberries

In a mixing bowl, cream together sugar and butter. Add egg; mix well. Combine flour, baking powder, and salt; add to creamed mixture alternately with milk. Stir in vanilla. Fold in blueberries. Fill 12 greased or paper-lined muffin cups two-thirds full.

STREUSEL
1/2 cup sugar
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
1/4 cup butter or margarine

In a small bowl, combine sugar, flour, and cinnamon; cut in butter until crumbly, then sprinkle mixture over muffins. Bake at 375 degrees for 25 to 30 minutes or until browned; test with toothpick.

A pier on the coast in Rockport

Along the Texas coast, telltale signs of past storms endure in the occasional skeletal remains of piers jutting into the Gulf and bays.

Kids running on the beach on St. Jo

When Hurricane Harvey struck last summer, it made landfall on San José Island, a coastal retreat where U.S. presidents have come to fish and fundraise, and everything but a broad and empty beach is owned by a family of billionaires.

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