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Written by Lois Rodriguez

We used to call Port Aransas a sleepy fishing village.

Far enough from DFW to feel like small-town Texas but close enough to draw on the Metroplex’s economic vitality, Granbury offers a slate of enticing options for tourists.

It would be understandable for Texans to grow weary of their capital city’s popularity and outsized national reputation as a funky cultural mecca.

Sportfishing rules at Lake Fork. In fact, the reservoir—which lies on the Sabine River 70 miles east of Dallas—ranks among the country’s top trophy bass lakes.

Deviled eggs may be the perfect party food. Portable, protein-packed, inexpensive, pretty, and easy to make, these little nuggets of deliciousness can stand up to myriad flavor combinations, from basic (mayo, mustard, pickle relish) to exotic (cream, truffle oil, pink peppercorns).

The original Dallas series ended long before the Internet age, but today devotees have several online resources to feed their mania. Here are links and descriptions of some of the most popular sites.

The Farm-to-Market roads of Austin County offer beautiful scenic routes in the springtime.

Located along Old US 67, now Van Zandt Road near Glen Rose, this structure of rock, petrified wood, and multicolored brick is what remains of the abandoned “Outlaw Station,” a filling station and Prohibition-era speakeasy.

The main entrance roads to Big Bend National Park offer about 50 meandering miles of glorious scenery.

Texas, how does your garden grow? Our Texas Wildflower Guide shares a behind-the-scenes look at wildflowers along Texas’ highways, prime times and places to typically see wildflowers, a regional breakdown of what to expect and a spotlight on 30 of the most common blooms.

Texas Highways has chosen 30 of Texas’ most common wildflowers to identify and celebrate. It is a brief introduction to the splendor of a Lone Star spring – just a sampling of the more than 5,000 blooming plants in our lush state, so forgive us if we’ve omitted your particular favorite.

The log cabin law office at the Sam Houston Memorial Museum in Huntsville offers a glimpse into Houston's 19th-Century work environment.

After crossing the Red River into Texas in December of 1832, Sam Houston’s first stop was the city of Nacogdoches, the gateway to Mexican territory and home to some of the region’s most influential residents.

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