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Written by Lois Rodriguez

22Between San Angelo and Abilene, about 12 miles north of Bronte, lies a remarkable fort with the only fully restored Butterfield Stage Stop in Texas.

 

 41A-fort

23Readers not only raved about Kerrville as a place to visit, but they also praised the city as a place to live, citing the rolling hills that frame the city, the Guadalupe River flowing through the center of town, abundant wildlife and outdoors opportunities, live theater, restaurants, art centers and galleries, and friendly people.

Contrary to popular belief, summer vacation did not originate as a time for rural schoolchildren to take an extended break to help out on the family farm.

If you’re interested in learning more about the ancient canyon-dwellers and rock art of the Lower Pecos Canyonlands, here are some online resources to get you started:

Illustration by Michael Witte

Almost 30 years ago, I drove every mile of Texas’ interstate highways in search of something to eat. Every mile. And not only did I drive those 3,232 miles, but I stopped for a bite approximately every 30 miles along the way.

In the far reaches of East Texas where the Sabine River flows, there is an oasis of culture, nature, and food. It’s a place where swampy lowlands meet towering pines, locally famous cuisine meets world-famous art, and the sour flavors of life disappear into something much sweeter. It’s a place called Orange.

Chef John Tesar of Dallas’ Spoon Bar & Kitchen and TV’s Top Chef, Season 10 was on hand at Fort Worth's inaugural Food + Wine Fest to share some of his restaurant’s seafood creations.

Fort Worth is a fine city, with plenty of laid-back charm and style. It’s home to world-class museums, honky tonks and an array of notable dining options.

April 2014’s wildflower feature—“Oooh … Aaah”—mentions our longtime friends at The University of Texas at Austin Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. Here are more details on our annual wildflower exhibit and other spring happenings at the Center.

One musical director, 6 days of rehearsal,  3-hour concert, 60 artists, 38 songs and 3 reasons to celebrate. It’s a labor of love for Austin’s musical roots, Kris Kristofferson and the life of beloved musician Stephen Bruton.

Photo © Theresa DiMenno

Over our 40 years as a travel magazine, we’ve been “Wowed by Wildflowers,” sowed “The Seeds of Spring,” joined in the “Dance of the Wildflowers,” and gawked at “The Great Texas Bloom Boom.” Our various themes have included thoughts from such diverse observers as Moravian-born author Karl Anton Postl, who in the mid-1800s described a Texas prairie “as if clothed with rainbows that waved to and fro,” and a modern-day fourth-grader from Woodville, who penned, “Thousands of blooming hands reaching in the sun … Marching through the meadow with hearts aglow.”

Photo by J. Griffis Smith Driving to Fredericksburg from the east on US 290, it’s easy to notice that spring adores the Hill Country: This oak-studded landscape is a hot spot for wildflowers—bluebonnets, firewheels, black-eyed Susans, and others color the vistas like a painting come to life, while roadside stands open in anticipation of peaches, tomatoes, blackberries, and other seasonal bounty coming to market.

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