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Feels Like Fall

Written by | Published November 4, 2009

The crisp autumn mornings of late are reminding me of my summer trip to the Fort Davis area. Even in August, the daytime highs climbed only to the 80s, and nighttime lows fell into the 60s, energizing temps that inspired numerous hikes in Davis Mountains State Park, with the magical CCC-constructed Indian Lodge as our base. News to me (and especially enjoyed by my kid) was the mile-and-a-half trail that descends from the park's scenic Skyline Drive to Fort Davis National Historic Site. Other trip highlights: star partying at McDonald Observatory (which we learned has a fun back-up plan for cloudy nights), rock-hunting at Woodward Ranch south of Alpine, and following the Rio Grande's flow as we drove the majestic River Road. Keep a lookout for TH's upcoming stories on the latter two in the February Big Bend special issue! 

Live Music and Lava Lamps

Written by | Published October 22, 2009

On a recent trip to San Angelo, I discovered an unusual venue in the middle of downtown. During the day, The House of Fifi Dubois is a vintage furniture store, but on many Saturday nights, it transforms into what has to be its true calling: a groovy setting for listening to live music. With the lights dimmed and all those couches and tables from the 50s, 60s, and 70s arranged in a semicircle to face a wooden stage at one end, it works perfectly. A good sound system also helps. As do good musicians, such as the six female performers I heard when I was there, the San Angelo Divas, a bluesy, folk-rock group with a big sound.

The system is simple. Store owners Phyllis Cox (Fifi) and Toni Hunter place a jar near the entrance to collect money to pay the band. It's strictly BYOB, although set-ups (Cokes, Sprite, water, etc) and a few snacks are on hand. The store provides the funky atmosphere (merchandise on display ranges from lava lamps to avocado-green ice buckets), the musicians do their thing, and listeners (twenty-somethings to seniors) drift in and out from 7 to 10. A few people are inspired to dance on the sidelines, but mostly, groups of friends just sit around enjoying the music in a comfy, super-cool setting. I can't wait to go again. For details, call 325-658-3434.

Art in Season in Houston

Written by | Published October 12, 2009

Last Saturday, I went to Houston's Bayou City Art Festival Downtown with my sister, Jean. I recently discovered that this festival had a former life as the Westheimer Art Festival, which I attended over 30 years ago.

Harmonic Convergence (CMigrator copy 1)

Written by | Published October 12, 2009
Thrilled to hear the Austin Symphony conducted by Peter Bay on Saturday evening at the impressive Long Center. The concert featured virtuoso Korean violinist Chee-Yun's dazzling take on Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto in E Minor, Op. 64. After intermission found the orchestra soaring with the majestic Symphony No. 4 in E-flat Major by Anton Bruckner. Exciting performance. Superb sightlines. Wonderful acoustics. See violinist Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg play a program of Barber with the symphony on January 15-16, 2010. For details, visit www.austinsymphony.org; 512/476-6064 or 888/4MAESTRO.

Setting Records

Written by | Published October 12, 2009
Attended the Austin Record Convention on Sunday. Terrific event for music lovers, particularly those who still appreciate vinyl LPs and 45s. Additionally, there were a considerable number of vendors from all over the U.S., Europe, and beyond, selling memorabilia like concert posters, T-shirts, banners, stage passes, ticket stubs, books, magazines, photos, autographs, and souvenir collectibles like a 20'' talking/singing James Brown replica, Beatles bobbleheads, and miniature guitars. If you're a fan of recorded music, including CDs, this is the place for you. The Austin Record Convention takes place on a weekend twice a year—once in the spring, and again in the fall. Lately, they've been held at the Crockett Center at 10601 N. Lamar. Admission is a bargain: $5—good for Saturday and Sunday. For more details, visit www.austinrecords.com; 512/288-7288.

Hotel pet peeves

Written by | Published October 12, 2009

I just returned from an out-of-state vacation, and while I had a fantastic time, I was glad to get back to Texas. A sign of a good trip, I think, and perhaps a certain level of satisfaction with my day-to-day routine. In general, I like hotel rooms, the mini-soaps and cute little packets of cotton balls, the comically out-of-proportion flat-screen TVs, the color-coordinated pillow shams, the wake-up calls, the luxury of room service.... But please, WHO thought it was a good idea to invent a single-cup coffeemaker? You've seen them, probably, they're ubiquitous. I'll concede that the concept SEEMS reasonable, pop a little coffee "pod" into the machine, along with six ounces of water (no more or the machine will shut off!), and several minutes later, you have a single cup of coffee. But I'd argue that these devices are not practical AT ALL for two people traveling together. What's with the pouring and the podding and the parceling, we wasted a colossal amount of time getting out the door in the morning. Oh, good grief I sound like Andy Rooney. Write me to share YOUR hotel pet peeves and maybe I won't feel so ridiculous.

Texarkana: Twice as Nice

Written by | Published October 12, 2009

Long a fun, famous gateway to the Lone Star State, Texarkana USA is a twin cities with lots of history combined with multiple modern attractions that makes for a delightful destination. Plenty to go, see, and do. Recently spent several entertaining days here researching a future feature for the magazine. Stay tuned. Thoroughly enjoyed my stay at the Mansion on Main, an historic B&B. Discovered a couple barbecue masters, Smokey Joe's Barbeque and Big Jake's Bar-B-Q, and 2 exceptional upscale dining options, The IronWood Grill and Timothy's. Don't miss 'em. My fascinating whirlwind trip included stops at Lake Wright Patman, the Regional Art Center, an interesting local piano restoration studio, old Union Station, the famous State Line Courthouse/Post Office, Bryce's Cafeteria, remodeled Tiger Stadium at Grim Park, the Ace of Clubs House, an antique auto museum, Sue & Carol's Restaurant (for breakfast & lunch), Arkansas' largest magnolia tree, the Perot Theatre, the Scott Joplin mural, and a whole lot more. Look for details in the January 2010 issue of Texas Highways. For additional information on Texarkana, check out the website; 903/792-7191.

Power to the People

Written by | Published October 1, 2009

Our friends at Lubbock's American Wind Power Center have sent an update to E. Dan Klepper's windmills story in the September special issue. On October 17, the center plans to unveil a 5,500-square-foot mural created by artist La Gina Fairbetter, an instructor in the Department of Architectural Art at Texas Tech University. The two-year project illustrates American windmill history, from 1700s Dutch-style windmills to today's massive wind turbines. All of the whirring wonders depicted are represented in the center's collection. Another good reason to make the AWPC part of your next High Plains adventure!

What is that sticky goo?

Written by | Published September 30, 2009

Long ago, I blogged about watching a troop of paper wasps attack a nasty web of webworms in one of my pecan trees, and now those same trees are providing the setting for yet another insect drama.

Church in the Wildwood

Written by | Published September 29, 2009

stainedglass

Working for Texas Highways has many rewards, but seeing an idea morph into print that is read around the world has to be one of the greatest.

Now's a great time to be at the beach

Written by | Published September 29, 2009

I just returned from an action-packed, three-day trip to South Padre Island, and wow--the beginning of fall is a fantastic time to be at the beach.

An offal experience

Written by | Published September 25, 2009

What's up with offal? Seems as though every menu I see these days has some form of offal on it, whether it's sweetbreads or lamb's hearts or some delicacy long treasured in Europe or Mexico, but only now (at least that I'm aware) earning praise in America. At Austin's East Side Showroom (a new, noisy restaurant in the freshly hip section of East 6th Street), I enjoyed a truly delicious salad of local field greens with cornmeal-crusted sweetbreads (that's pancreas and thymus glands, y'all), then another night at Vino Vino, a wine bar on Guadalupe, I tried its version of sweetbreads on the appetizer menu. (Love Vino Vino for the topnotch wine selection and cozy, clubby ambiance.) At then at Olivia, the South Lamar restaurant, recently lauded by Bon Appetit as one of American's top ten new restaurants, the chef served an intriguing appetizer of bacon-wrapped jalapeno stuffed with lamb's heart. The owner told me he takes pride in serving the whole animal, "from the rooter to the pooter." Anthony Bourdain, eat your heart out. Ahem.

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