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Play Ball! (CMigrator copy 1)

Written by | Published March 30, 2009

Spring is in the air, and so are pop flies and home runs at Round Rock's Dell Diamond ballpark, home of the Triple-A Round Rock Express. The Express' pre-season kicks off this weekend with an exhibition game against the Corpus Christi Hooks on April 5. The fabulous ballpark, included in ESPN's Great Baseball Destinations, features seating options that range from rows closer to home plate than the pitcher's mound, to big, comfy rocking chairs, to the Luxury Skybox Suite. And yes, you can even watch the ballgame from the pool beyond right field (I envy those pool people on hot summer evenings). My kid is too young to sit still through multiple innings, so we usually opt for general admission/berm seating ($6 adults, $5 kids under 12, free 2 and younger; remember the $5 parking fee), which allows us to roam carefree from the playscape to the Moon Jump to the snowcone machine. And there's plenty of room on the berm for the occasional Chicken Dance and for kids to roll down the grassy hill. This year, we bought the Spike's Kids Club package, which includes 20 tickets (pre-selected games) and a t-shirt, mesh bag, and other goodies.  

For a schedule, tickets, and more on special promotions and events (like giveaways and Friday-night fireworks), go to the Express Web site. And baseball buffs, be sure to check out Sheryl Smith-Rodgers' Q&A with pitching legend Nolan Ryan in April TH.

Zipping Along

Written by | Published March 27, 2009

I'm terrified of heights, so naturally, I wanted to go on an adventure that would challenge that fear. Yes, I'm a little insane. But isn't that the way to conquer fears? Well, I suppose a healthy fear is good for survival, but I found what I thought would be a safe way to face that fear head-on: ziplining. I highly recommend the experience.

After revisiting an article that we ran in Texas Highways last August, I decided that this was the year I would brave it. Luckily, one of my best friends in Houston had the same idea (always on the same wavelength, that's why we're buds). Within a week's time, we drummed up a group of 10 friends (me in Austin, the rest from Houston) to visit the Cypress Valley Canopy Tours in Spicewood. What fun!

I put on my brave hat while shaking inside, but after the first leap, I was having a blast. You're so securely harnessed in and connected to the zip line that it's hard to truly feel vulnerable. Plus, our trusted guides, Lindsey and Andi, used their expertise and a bit of humor to take the edge off and make it fun. Granted, this probably isn't as high or as long as zipling down a mountain in Costa Rica, but it's a fun adventure just the same. And it was just my speed, so to speak.

I didn't even mind the three rope sky bridges we had to traverse (and I've never gotten on them, even at amusement parks, because I'm even more terrified of them!), but the harness helped quell that fear, too. We zipped along six lines from one tree platform to another (up to 40 feet high), passing up Lofthaven, the furnished tree house that you can zip to and rent for the night.

Thanks to the drought, there was little water running through the property, but I'm sure it adds an extra dimension of excitement and natural wonder, so, I definitely hope there will be water on my next visit.

When I go again, and I will, I will try the more challenging tour, which has longer zip lines, and challenges that they say ranges from "moderate to difficult." I'm up for it!

If you've ever had a curiosity about ziplining, but are being held back by fear, I say DO it! If I can, you can.

If you've been, what was your experience like and where did you go?

Vietnam to Austin—a Cultural Journey

Written by | Published March 27, 2009

Last weekend a friend and I attended the opening of Vietnam to Austin: Restoring Community, the first Asian-Amercian exhibit at the Austin History Center. The exhibit, with the help of the Vietnamese American Heritage Foundation, documents the struggles and accomplishments of Austin's largest Asian community, and their contributions as Americans.

Eating Under the Radar

Written by | Published March 20, 2009

For the July 2007 issue of TH, I wrote a story about the hour-long Hidden Kitchens Texas (HKTX) radio special that debuted on NPR a couple of years ago. Produced by The Kitchen Sisters in collaboration with KUT in Austin and narrated by Willie Nelson, the program described under-the-radar kitchens across the state, from a Dallas gas station that serves great tacos to the NASA lab in Houston that develops space food. It was fun writing about that project, and now I have an update: At a SXSW party in Austin a few nights ago, Nikki Silvia and Davia Nelson, aka The Kitchen Sisters, launched a new book based on the rollicking audio program, complete with colorful photos and recipes.

Lunch in McKinney; Coffee in Sherman

Written by | Published March 3, 2009

When my sister and I visited my daughter at Austin College in Sherman, we took the opportunity to explore nearby McKinney and have lunch at The Pantry Restaurant, in the historic downtown area. The spacious yet cozy cafe serves a variety of sandwiches, salads, soups, and other entrees, and also has a wide selection of creamy pies. I wish I could say I sampled one, and I really should have, but the tortilla soup/salad/cornbread combo was plenty for me as was the stuffed baked potato/soup combo was for my sister. My daughter, also full from her sandwich/salad combo, ordered a slice of chocolate-chip cream pie to take back to the dorm.

Mod Squad

Written by | Published March 3, 2009

When the Blanton Museum of Art opened its new building in Austin a few years ago, I signed on as a member. It wasn't long before I understood the appeal of supporting the arts. Philanthropy notwithstanding, members get discounted entry to special parties and events, a nicely designed monthly newsletter, free admission to exhibits, and discounts at the very cool gift store (which opened last month, along with the Blanton Cafe). Now that I'm a member, I definitely go to the museum more often—it's free, fun, and philanthropic!

Quest for Romance

Written by | Published February 3, 2009

Valentine's Day Is on its way And thus here goes This poem

It's silly, I'm aware, But I'd love for you to share Those romantic Texas spots if you know'em.

Where, in Texas, would you find the most romantic setting for the perfect "I love you."

Remember, our diversity is what makes us special, so non-traditional settings are welcome, too!

Austin Makes "10 Destinations to Watch" List

Written by | Published January 29, 2009

Last year, when I went on vacation in Mazatlãn, Mexico, my group followed the keen advice of a columnist in Arthur Frommer's magazine Budget Travel and rented a century-year-old home in the historic district. I'm planning to stay closer to home this year, but I still check the Budget Travel Web site for deals, and I especially like the blog. Imagine my surprise this week to find my hometown of Austin on the editors' Top 10 Destinations To Watch list for 2009—sharing company with Berlin, Budapest, Cambodia, Hawaii, Mexico, Panama, Reykjavik, Vancouver, and Washington, D.C.(I'm not sure why the editors narrowed some places down to the city, and went for states or even countries in others, but no matter.)

Power to the Plaza

Written by | Published January 27, 2009

Over coffee at Sweetish Hill on West 6th St in Austin, Architect Hal Box shared his thoughts on the new book he's writing about plazas in Mexico. He and coauthor Logan Wagner (Texas A&M University School of Architecture) have measured 90 plazas and have an extensive collection of drawings and photographs to accompany the drawings.

Beyond Barbecue in Llano

Written by | Published January 26, 2009

When we're hungry, but not in the mood for 'cue in our favorite Hill Country town, we find a booth at Stonewall's Pizza, Wings and Things on Llano's courthouse square (101 W. Main). While there this past weekend, our group indulged in the fried-chicken salad (with honey-mustard dressing), cheeseburgers (delicious, doughy buns; served with battered fries), and a sausage-and-pepperoni pizza (wonderful crispy-but-chewy crust). We topped it off with Blue Bell Cotton Candy milkshakes! Yes, there are healthier items on the menu, including a turkey sandwich that my cousin swears by. By the way: On the edge of town on Texas 29, I noticed what must be a new place that sells bottle trees (anyone been there?). The shop was closed when we passed by, but the displays of colorful glass radiating in the late-day sun had me rethinking my backyard landscape on the drive home.

The Squeeze

Written by | Published January 23, 2009

I was recently visiting with a friend who works in the hotel business in Austin, and she and I discussed a trend I'm seeing more of these days: As the national economy feels a squeeze, hotels aren't necessarily lowering their rates, but they are offering more package deals—reserve two nights and get a third for free, a restaurant credit with a night's lodging, wine-and-cheese basket in room—that sort of thing. So when you book a room at your next Texas vacation spot, be sure to ask about similar deals.

And while we're on the subject of a sluggish economy, how has it affected your personal travel plans? Or has it? As for me, I've gotten a lot less shy about packing a cooler and making those on-the-road dinners stretch into lunch the next day. As long as I can find ice, this works even if the place I'm staying doesn't have a fridge.

So: Are you taking shorter trips or staying closer to home? Packing PP&J for breakfast? I'd love it if you'd share your tips for traveling on a budget. And, would you like to read more of this sort of thing in TH?

Go West!

Written by | Published January 6, 2009

We're excited about the February issue of Texas Highways (which is in the mail). This issue includes feature articles about Marfa, Fort Davis and the Big Bend Ranch State Park.

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