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Pirate Beach Logo1Avast Ye! LEGOLAND Discovery Center Dallas/Fort Worth plans to launch an interactive waterpark called Pirate Beach.

Published in Blog

Cows

My first taste of the Texas cheese renaissance came at a farmers market in Dallas, where I nibbled a bite of Veldhuizen Texas Farmstead Cheese from Dublin. “This cheddar is made in Texas?” I exclaimed, shocked at how much it reminded me of flavorful cheeses from Wisconsin and England.

Published in TRAVEL

26 Fearing

Dean Fearing strides across the dining room from his kitchen inside The Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Dallas, delivering an appetizer of Texas Carpaccio to a couple enjoying a lavish dinner. The famous chef, cutting a contemporary profile in his crisp, white chef jacket, blue jeans, and cowboy boots, introduces himself with a grin and handshake.

Published in FOOD & DRINK

About 30 years ago, a trailblazing soap opera about a greedy, glamorous, and volatile Texas family captivated millions of viewers around the globe.

Published in TRAVEL

The original Dallas series ended long before the Internet age, but today devotees have several online resources to feed their mania. Here are links and descriptions of some of the most popular sites.

Published in CULTURE & LIFESTYLE

In the Plants are Alive gallery, large models demonstrate the inner working of plants and the functions of their different parts.

My husband and I fell in love with the Dallas Arboretum through years of snapping photos of our four kids tucked among tulips and propped on pumpkins. Soon they were old enough to frolic in the Toad Corners Fountain, peek into garden cottages, and run barefoot across velvety lawns amid concert music and fireflies. So when I learned about the Dallas Arboretum’s plan to open a world-class children’s garden, we scheduled a family visit to explore its new wonders first-hand.

Published in TRAVEL

Like fraternal twins with different personalities, the North Texas cities of Dallas and Fort Worth—roughly 30 miles apart by car or train—offer almost everything a traveler could want in an urban vacation, from outdoors adventures to art, history, fine dining, nightlife, and museums.

Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge, Dallas

Published in TRAVEL

The Texas Highways Magazine Readers' Choice Top 40 Travel Destinations

Last fall, we asked Texas Highways readers to share their favorite places in the state for our Texas Top-40 Travel Destinations. And share you did—by phone, email, Facebook, and through many amazingly detailed letters. Thousands of TH readers helped to shape the final list, which we will divulge throughout 2014, Texas Highways’ 40th-anniversary year

Published in TRAVEL

Fifty years ago on this date, the President and Mrs. John F. Kennedy checked into Suite 850 of the Hotel Texas in Fort Worth. It would be the last night of the president's life; he was assassinated the following day, November 22, 1963, in Dallas.

Published in Blog

(Photos by Will van Overbeek)

Farmers markets are obvious attractions for serious foodies in search of fresh produce, locally sourced cheese and meat, and artisanal condiments. But even for a casual visitor, a trip to the farmers market can be a fulfilling expedition. This is particularly true at the Dallas Farmers Market, where the produce stalls and restaurant stands provide an interesting introduction to the people and foods of a sprawling metroplex that can be otherwise hard to get a handle on. In the bustling sheds, you will find toothsome slices of the ranching, African-American, and Latino cultures that have shaped modern North Texas.

Published in FOOD & DRINK

In downtown Dallas' historic West End district, the Sixth Floor Museum at Dealy Plaza chronicles the life and legacy of President John F. Kennedy. (Photo by Will van Overbeek)

I was sitting at the lunch counter of Coots’ Drugstore, at the corner of Marsh Lane and Walnut Hill Road in Dallas. We had been let out of school that Friday so that we could follow President John F. Kennedy as he and First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy landed at Love Field and then rode in a motorcade through downtown. But the excitement turned to anguish and confusion as news came over the radio that the president had been shot and killed.

Published in History

At the Double Wide, a bar and live music venue on the edge of Deep Ellum, the name says it all.(Photos by Michael Amador)

In the 1920s and ‘30s, music filled the streets, theaters, joints, and churches of Deep Ellum, an area just east of downtown Dallas that thrived as an African-American mecca of culture and commerce before construction of Central Expressway altered the neighborhood’s character after World War II. Named for the languid, southern pronunciation of Elm Street, the district was mythologized by “Deep Ellum Blues,” a 1930s folk tune about backstabbing women, backsliding preachers, and cops on the take.

Published in TRAVEL
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