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Courtesy National Museum of Funeral History

Capitalizing on its naturally spooky atmosphere, the National Museum of Funeral History in Houston is holding a series of special events to celebrate Halloween and el Dia de Los Muertos.

Published in EVENTS

Monarch Butterfly Image courtesy Theresa DiMenno.

Theresa DiMenno first noticed the plump caterpillars in her backyard a few years ago, voraciously eating newly sprouted milkweed plants.

Published in EVENTS

AstrodomeHouston’s Astrodome may sit abandoned and seemingly unwanted, but many kept sight of the iconic dome’s value and have worked tirelessly to see it be given a chance for a new life.

Published in Blog

The Judd Residence Block

The writers who contribute to Texas Highways exemplify a few traits in common: They’re experienced travelers guided by curiosity, adventure, culture, and hard-earned wisdom.

Published in TRAVEL

 Nancy Moyer with Mark Clark, Border Fence Series: Border Scenarios (Mexican View), 2013, reversible neck piece

The landscape, culture, and political turbulence of the United States-Mexico border region take center stage in La Frontera, an exhibition of art jewelry at Houston Center for Contemporary Craft.

Published in EVENTS

A few years ago, I had the good fortune to attend one of the inaugural “Where the Chefs Eat” culinary tours of Houston (www.houstonculinarytours.com) , which introduced participants to a bevy of eateries that aren’t on the radar of most visitors.  We ate cabrito accompanied by live mariachi at El Hidalguense, an unassuming restaurant on Long Point Road; compared barbecue at three sites known for their different styles; explored the foods of Thailand and India until we thought we might burst; then wrapped up with an exploration of the vast ethnic-food aisles at 99 Ranch Market—all accompanied by such nationally regarded chefs  as Monica Pope, Hugo Ortega, Randy Evans, and Chris Shepherd, who observed, “I think a lot of people are afraid to get out of their comfort zones. When they do, though, it becomes more than just going out to eat; it becomes an education into another culture.” bvYUagfuro0EDtGtvoaCEkl2b6ZVGwx0djukTVgTFc4

Published in Blog: Plates

15 FaceCar

On a sunny day last May, the bustle of traffic along Houston’s Allen Parkway momentarily slowed to a crawl comprised of fancifully decorated cars, costumed unicyclists, and lawn mower-driving artists.

Published in CULTURE & LIFESTYLE

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On Fridays, shuttle to Space Center Houston for a planetary power lunch—“Lunch With an Astronaut.”

Published in EVENTS

Brett Posey, the Houston Zoo's seal lion supervisor, plays with Jonah, one of four California sea lions at the zoo. (Photo by Michael Amador)

I’ll confess that I have never been a big zoo fan—until recently, that is. I blame the small, sad zoos that I visited as a kid, where skinny, world-weary animals paced in tight quarters. Thankfully, matters have changed dramatically since then, as I discovered during a recent trip to Houston.

Published in Family Travel

The Texas Highways Readers' Choice Top 40 Travel Destinations

Last fall, we asked Texas Highways readers to share their favorite places in the state for our Texas Top-40 Travel Destinations. And share you did—by phone, email, Facebook, and through many amazingly detailed letters. Thousands of TH readers helped to shape the final list, which we will divulge throughout 2014, Texas Highways’ 40th-anniversary year.

 
Published in TRAVEL

A longtime hub for innovation in energy and medicine, Houston has come into its own as a vacation destination in recent years.

Published in TRAVEL

Chefs Hugo and Ruben Ortega make their own chocolate for this triple-threat dessert: churros, a scoop of house-made chocolate ice cream and a cup of hot chocolate. (Photos by Will van Overbeek)

I’ve got a soft spot in my heart for Hugo’s, the decade-old restaurant in the heart of Houston’s hip Montrose district that has helped awaken palates raised on Tex-Mex to the complexities of interior Mexican fare. Hugo’s is where I first encountered Oaxacan-style, pan-sautéed grasshoppers (served with avocado, tomatillo salsa, and mini corn tortillas), and where I discovered the smoky allure of artisan mescal. Over the years and in the course of many visits, I’ve enjoyed the restaurant’s braised pork shoulder with mashed plantain bananas ($22), its amazing lentil cakes with strips of fire-roasted chiles ($8), and its roasted red snapper a la Veracruzana ($22), the latter a tangy fish dish prepared with tomatoes, olives, and capers.  I like the historic yet somehow modern feel of the restaurant itself, too: Designed in 1925 by Austrian architect Joseph Finger (who also designed Houston’s Art Deco City Hall and many other structures throughout the city), the building is now blanketed in decades of ivy. Inside, exposed rose-colored brick, butter-colored walls displaying vintage matador paintings, and a polished-concrete bar stocked with spirits and wines from throughout the world make Hugo’s a topnotch spot for a meal or $5 margaritas during happy hour.

Published in FOOD & DRINK
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