Skip to content

18 LuisThe eyes of five-year-old Luis Jiménez filled with wonder the day in 1945 he stood before the dramatic works of los tres grandes muralistas—Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siqueiros—at Mexico City’s Museo de Bellas Artes.

Published in CULTURE & LIFESTYLE

Courtesy EnPleinAirTexas

Taking its name from the French expression for painting “in the open air,” the inaugural EnPleinAirTEXAS in San Angelo (Oct. 27-Nov. 2, 2014) features 33 selected artists competing for $13,000 in prize money.

Published in EVENTS

Art Connections Gallery, at 908 Main Street in downtown Bastrop, features the work  of more than  90 artists, mostly from Central Texas.

Instead of pigeon-holing Bastrop as a place to stop for a piece of pie and a poke around the shops, my husband and I arrive for a weekend visit to take a fresh look at Bastrop as a place for enjoying art and other handcrafted beauty. Hearing from friends that roughly a dozen art galleries now populate Bastrop’s historic downtown, we’re curious to find out whether this means one of our favorite Central Texas escapes deserves the designation of art destination. As soon as we walk inside the Lost Pines Art Bazaar, we think we’ve found an affirmative answer.

Published in TRAVEL

The Wimberley Community Center displays portions of Winn’s 1950 mural The History of Ranching, including the section above.

The artist, inventor, architect, and teacher Buck Winn first beheld the hills of Wimberley in the late 1930s. Enchanted by the valley’s flowing waters and natural beauty, Winn and his wife, Kitty, bought 1,100 acres about two miles east of the old limestone buildings on Wimberley’s square.

Published in People

Che Guerra holds a Spanish oil-on-copper retablo at Nuevo Santander Gallery.

Most Texans with deep roots in the state treasure the contributions their ancestors made to its unique history. But there may not be a clan with a keener appreciation of its role in this immense and storied land than the Guerra family of far South Texas.

Published in CULTURE & LIFESTYLE

Radioactive-Cats--1980-Sandy-Skoglund

An aloof cat contemplates the purpose of art in society; dripping-wet otterhounds partake in a moment of respite from their midday hunt; a small black cat nestles into the chest of composer Igor Stravinsky; a menacing dog leaps onto the hood of a car in modern-day suburbia. Scenes like these, reflecting the historically fluid roles of our favorite pets, make up the Blanton Museum of Art’s newest exhibition, In the Company of Cats and Dogs

Published in Blog

Yah-nah-pah (1889-1913), rug, 1910, Stark Museum of Art

In Orange, the Stark Museum of Art explores the history of Navajo textiles in Navajo Weaving: Tradition & Trade.

Published in EVENTS

The Valley House Gallery and Sculpture Garden in Dallas is celebrating its 60th anniversary this year with a commemorative exhibition.

Published in CULTURE & LIFESTYLE

In the Fort Worth Cultural District, fans of culture, art, and history will find plenty to keep them busy year-round. Here are some upcoming exhibitions to consider on your next trip:

Marsden Hartley Fishermen’s Last Supper, Nova Scotia, 1940-41, Oil on hardboard. Collection Friends of the Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase College, State University of New York, gift from the estate of Roy R. Neuberger

Published in CULTURE & LIFESTYLE

Jerry Bywaters, Century Plant, 1939, Oil on Masonite, Collection of Alexander H. Albritton

In 1932, a group of young Dallas artists captured national attention with their innovative interpretations of the Texas landscape and people, drawing on their own distinct vision and borrowing from styles like surrealism and cubism.

Published in EVENTS

Fifty years ago on this date, the President and Mrs. John F. Kennedy checked into Suite 850 of the Hotel Texas in Fort Worth. It would be the last night of the president's life; he was assassinated the following day, November 22, 1963, in Dallas.

Published in Blog

The room where artist Georgia O'Keeffe lived in Canyon south of Amarillo was so tiny it held only an iron bed and a wooden fruit crate. Sparse suited her because she preferred to sit on the floor to paint and draw.

Published in CULTURE & LIFESTYLE
Page 1 of 2
Back to top