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On March 2, 1836, 59 delegates gathered at Washington-on-the-Brazos to sign the Texas Declaration of Independence, setting in motion a series of battles that would lead to Texas’ independence from Mexico. Cities and towns throughout Texas will celebrate the occasion on March 2 (see “Events” at texashighways.com for a lengthy list), but two caught our eyes for their unusual nature.

Published in Blog: Events

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The arrival of March heralds not only a season of growth and beginnings, but also our great state’s birthday.

Published in EVENTS

The log cabin law office at the Sam Houston Memorial Museum in Huntsville offers a glimpse into Houston's 19th-Century work environment.

After crossing the Red River into Texas in December of 1832, Sam Houston’s first stop was the city of Nacogdoches, the gateway to Mexican territory and home to some of the region’s most influential residents.

Published in History

Presidio La Bahia hosts a reenactment of the Goliad Massacre each March. The Gonzales Memorial Museum chronicles the Battle of Gonzales and its role in the Texas Revolution. (Photo by J. Griffis Smith)

The memory of battle held strong in Texans’ minds as Seguín and others from San Antonio honored the Alamo heroes. Though conflicts between Texas and Mexico began as early as 1826, the Texas Revolution’s most decisive events took place between October 1835 and April 1836. Those seven months tell a story of tragedy, courage, and larger-than-life participants as bold and dramatic as any in human history.

Published in History
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