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The Galveston-Bolivar ferry remains closed Monday morning as a result of an oil spill in Galveston Bay. The Texas Department of Transportation, which runs the ferry, says the U.S. Coast Guard requested that ferry service be suspended in the aftermath of the Saturday afternoon spill.

Published in Blog

Jack King, La King's proprietor.

Staring wide-eyed at neatly stacked rows of chocolate truffles, blocks of creamy fudge, and chocolate-dipped pretzels, I’m in awe. And a little giddy. Nothing brings out the kid in me quite like an old-fashioned candy store. And in my opinion, the best place to rekindle that childhood nostalgia is La King’s Confectionery, an iconic candy shop and ice cream parlor on Galveston Island

Published in FOOD & DRINK

(Photos by Will Van Overbeek)

The woman behind the registration desk at the Hotel Galvez glanced at the number as she handed me my keycard. “Oh, you’re staying in our special room,” she said, eyebrows raised. “Did you know that?”

Published in TRAVEL

(Courtesy www.txgenweb.org)

The newest addition to Galveston’s shoreline, the $60 million Galveston Island Historic Pleasure Pier is futuristic by boardwalk standards, with 16 rides, various carnival games, and dazzling LED light displays. But the history of the island’s seaside amusement park dates to the 19th Century.

Published in TRAVEL

Reopened in May 2012, Galveston’s Historic Pleasure Pier offers rides, restaurants, a midway, and shops—much as the island’s Pleasure Pier did in the 1940s.  (Photos by Jake Meharg)

I’ve always loved Galveston, and now I have a local connection. My boyfriend’s grandmother, Alba Collins, grew up in a tiny house underneath the island’s first wooden rollercoaster in the 1930s. And we visit her every so often, spending sunny, summer weekends soaking our toes in the Gulf waters as we listen to her stories about Galveston in earlier days.

Published in TRAVEL

Salvatore

Galveston became the largest city in Texas between 1830 and 1860, when shippers exported more cotton from its wharves than from any other American port. Italian brothers Rosario “Rose” Maceo and Salvatore “Sam” Maceo in time brought big-time gaming to the port city.

Published in History

The kids are back in school, and we’re already working on the winter Texas Events Calendar, but hopefully there’s still room in everyone’s schedule for summer’s last hurrah – Labor Day!

In addition to the usual holiday celebrations, many communities choose this weekend to put on some of their biggest and most unique events.

Published in Blog

Seven named cemeteries –– between 40th and 42nd streets ––form Broadway Cemetery. (Photo by Sarah Kerver)

In the 19th Century, tragedies washed over Galveston as regularly as the tides: deadly fires, yellow-fever epidemics, and hurricanes. Anecdotally, this legacy of destruction left Galveston one of the nation’s most haunted cities. Even for travelers without a taste for the macabre, the wide range of said-to-be-haunted sites offers a fascinating glimpse into Galveston’s colorful past. In fact, I’ve come to the Island to learn more about local history, largely by looking for ghosts.

Published in TRAVEL
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